How is Child Support Determined?

Florida determines child support using the Child Support Guidelines. It is a complicated formula using both parties' incomes, and factoring in child care costs, health and dental insurance costs, and the amount of overnights each party has with the children. The court has a right to order up to two years of retroactive child support back to the date of the parties' separation.

The issue of child support can be contentious in a divorce; the two parties may disagree about parenting time, or whether child support is necessary when there is a generally an equal amount of time spent with each parent. Under Florida law, you may or may not be ordered to pay child support. The facts that are considered when the court makes a decision will include the following:

  • The number of children of the marriage;
  • The income of each parent;
  • The combined income of the two parents;
  • The percent of financial responsibility of each parent;
  • The costs of child care;
  • The cost of health insurance;
  • The cost of health, dental and prescriptions not covered by insurance;
  • The number of overnight stays with each parent;
  • And others.

No judge can hope to fully understand the unique dynamics of your family and children. The formula will be applied when the court is forced to make a decision about this vital matter. Where do you stand with regard to child support? If you are planning a divorce, this is one issue that you need to fully understand, as it will have a significant impact on the ability to provide for your children, and the estimated costs to you and to the other parent. There can be a request to deviate from the official child support guidelines, but you need an attorney to assist you to resolve any matter related to child support.

Contact Richard A. Heller P.A. for a consultation about child support and Florida law.

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